MAKING OF: Rowan (Mountain Ash) Print

The Rowan tree reoccurs in myths and folklore. This is not surprising when you consider the striking sight of a lone brave Rowan tree in late Summer, laden with red berries, growing on a barren rocky mountain hill.

In Irish language, Rowan trees are known as Caorthann. In Irish folklore there are recurring themes of protection offered by the Rowan. Sprigs of Rowan were used as a protection for the cattle and against the supernatural forces. Rowan would be hung in roof rafters of a new house to protect it from fire and storms.

The other common name for rowan is the Mountain Ash. A reference to the fact that the tree will grow at a high altitude even on rocky, barren ground.

The latin name 'sorbus aucuparia' comes from the Latin 'aucupor' meaning to catch birds. The creamy strongly scented flowers ripen into scarlet berries which colour early in the season and provide food for many birds throughout the winter.

Given all of these wonderful symbolism we think this print would make a wonderful housewarming present.

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Gearoid Muldowney